twigbookshop

twigbookshop:

Orphan Black is back! In between convincing my kith and kin to binge-watch the first season, quick, I’ve put together a recommendation list for the lovers of cons, clones, and cult-classics in your life. 

Pattern Recognition, by William Gibson 

Sci-fi giant William Gibson’s globe-spinning thriller of corporate shenanigans and human quirks. 

Sekret, by Lindsay Smith 

Cold War espionage meets mad science and superpowers when teenaged psychic Yulia is forced into a world where everyone wants something and no one can be trusted. 

Pawn, by Aimee Carter 

Kitty has a chance at wealth and power in her caste-bound society—if she transforms herself into the prime minister’s niece and dives head first into the plots and rebellion that got her killed. 

Snow Crash, by Neal Stephenson

All-powerful corporations, virtual katana duels, a sass-mouthed skater chick, Sumerian mythology, movie-watching pirates, and hacking the human brain. 

The Likeness, by Tana French

When a corpse turns up bearing not only Detective Cassie Maddox’s likeness but also an ID matching one of Cassie’s old undercover identities, Cassie agrees to go undercover as the murder victim. Then things get complicated. Tana French’s Dublin Murder Squad mysteries are atmospheric, complex, creepy and engrossing. 

White Cat, by Holly Black 

A teenaged grifter with a past gets rapidly in over his head in this genre-bending tale of crime, conspiracy, memory and magic. 

Never Let Me Go, by Kazuo Ishiguro 

It bears no resemblance to Orphan Black in tone, structure, style or philosophy, but Never Let Me Go remains one of my favorite explorations of what it means to be human in a world which may or may not recognize you as such. And there are clones. So it goes on the list. 

Great list! Happy to be a part of it!

thenovl
thenovl:

You know when you read something and you have to stop every other page because you want to read it out loud to the person sitting next to you?
This is like that. Only you’re the person sitting next to us and we can’t read it out loud because this book doesn’t come out until January!
Grrr. C’est la vie.
Holly Black’s The Darkest Part of the Forest marks her triumphant return to her faerie roots, and will be out January 13, 2015. Until then here’s a taste:

Children can have a cruel, absolute sense of justice. Children can kill a monster and feel quite proud of themselves. A girl can look at her brother and believe they’re destined to be a knight and a bard who battle evil. She can believe she’s found the thing she’s been made for.
Hazel lives with her brother, Ben, in the strange town of Fairfold where humans and fae exist side by side. The faeries’ seemingly harmless magic attracts tourists, but Hazel knows how dangerous they can be, and she knows how to stop them. Or she did, once.
At the center of it all, there is a glass coffin in the woods. It rests right on the ground and in it sleeps a boy with horns on his head and ears as pointed as knives. Hazel and Ben were both in love with him as children. The boy has slept there for generations, never waking.
Until one day, he does…
As the world turns upside down, Hazel tries to remember her years pretending to be a knight. But swept up in new love, shifting loyalties, and the fresh sting of betrayal, will it be enough?

And this cover! Beautiful, right?

thenovl:

You know when you read something and you have to stop every other page because you want to read it out loud to the person sitting next to you?

This is like that. Only you’re the person sitting next to us and we can’t read it out loud because this book doesn’t come out until January!

Grrr. C’est la vie.

Holly Black’s The Darkest Part of the Forest marks her triumphant return to her faerie roots, and will be out January 13, 2015. Until then here’s a taste:

Children can have a cruel, absolute sense of justice. Children can kill a monster and feel quite proud of themselves. A girl can look at her brother and believe they’re destined to be a knight and a bard who battle evil. She can believe she’s found the thing she’s been made for.

Hazel lives with her brother, Ben, in the strange town of Fairfold where humans and fae exist side by side. The faeries’ seemingly harmless magic attracts tourists, but Hazel knows how dangerous they can be, and she knows how to stop them. Or she did, once.

At the center of it all, there is a glass coffin in the woods. It rests right on the ground and in it sleeps a boy with horns on his head and ears as pointed as knives. Hazel and Ben were both in love with him as children. The boy has slept there for generations, never waking.

Until one day, he does…

As the world turns upside down, Hazel tries to remember her years pretending to be a knight. But swept up in new love, shifting loyalties, and the fresh sting of betrayal, will it be enough?

And this cover! Beautiful, right?

thistleandweedswritingco asked:

I was wondering if you're the Holly Black that's coming to Mt. Pleasant, Michigan, on April 11 & 12. I checked your website but it doesn't have it listed so I'm thinking no, but hey, there's an ask button so why not! You're awesome BTW.

YES. I am coming for Imagining the Fantastic 2.

Currently doing a massive website overhaul, so my website is going to be woefully neglected for a couple more months, then ALL NEW.

gwendabond

sarahreesbrennan:

cindypon:

diversityinya:

Diversity in Publishers Weekly’s 2013 Young Adult Bestsellers

The number of diverse YA titles — when diverse means main characters of color, LGBT and/or disabled main characters — has remained flat. There has been no improvement overall since last year.

Read the whole post with charts and analysis at DiversityinYA.com.

for all the discussion on diversity of late, numbers stay flat for the bestsellers in YA. but as i was saying on twitter last night, the majority of diverse authors and diverse books are not given lead title status.

Relevant to my last reblog of Malinda’s awesome book for cheapsies. Relevant also: Malinda and Cindy’s books are both awesome!

It’s not just a question of ‘the books aren’t there’ though more would be great!

The books that are there are not getting the support they deserve.

letmedrawsomething
letmedrawsomething:

so here we have a drawing for this +100 followers goal/celebration.
thelynburnlegacyitalia asked me for HOLLA, but I’ve already did the girls a couple of times, my favorite is this one
This drawing instead was a suggestion made by theshardsofmyheart. She wanted Gavriel from the “Coldest Girl in Coldtown” with Jared from the “Lynburn Legacy” in a sexy pose… seriously I’ve almost got a nose bleeding just by thinking about it.
At the end I’m not proud of Jared, but Gavriel is hot as always…I mean, cold… I should keep practicing on Jared…what a pity, just drawing Jared until the end of times…
so there’s a dialogue between them and is something like this:

Jared: So…shorty, are you afraid of me?
Gavriel: Yo blondie! you are 100 years too young for scaring me…


Jared, you are so TALL! Also, I think that vampire is staring at your neck. 

letmedrawsomething:

so here we have a drawing for this +100 followers goal/celebration.

thelynburnlegacyitalia asked me for HOLLA, but I’ve already did the girls a couple of times, my favorite is this one

This drawing instead was a suggestion made by theshardsofmyheart. She wanted Gavriel from the “Coldest Girl in Coldtown” with Jared from the “Lynburn Legacy” in a sexy pose… seriously I’ve almost got a nose bleeding just by thinking about it.

At the end I’m not proud of Jared, but Gavriel is hot as always…I mean, cold… I should keep practicing on Jared…what a pity, just drawing Jared until the end of times…

so there’s a dialogue between them and is something like this:

Jared: So…shorty, are you afraid of me?

Gavriel: Yo blondie! you are 100 years too young for scaring me…

Jared, you are so TALL! Also, I think that vampire is staring at your neck. 

sarahreesbrennan

sarahreesbrennan:

tereshkova2001:

ellidfics:

mikes-grrl:

Link is to a very long and thoughtful article by Sarah Rees Brennan, a successful YA author, about the penalties she has paid in her professional writing career because she once wrote fanfic.

It’s getting a fair amount of play as an example of a victim of misogyny speaking out against the forces that oppressed her, but let me be very clear about this:

SHE’S PART OF THE PROBLEM. 

Has she suffered? Yes, clearly and obviously. She has been harassed, dismissed and made fun of because she wrote fanfic. You know who hates her most of all for this?

HERSELF.

When confronted with her terrible, tragic past as a fanfic author, she felt embarrassed and humiliated. She wasn’t proud of what she had written, she was ashamed of it. She admits to pulling down all of her fic. Her essay closes with this commentary:

It was years ago. I’m sorry I did it. So much bad stuff has happened to me because of it that it feels like I committed an awful crime. I know that’s not true, and I don’t want anyone who writes fanfiction to feel that way, but it’s how I feel. I’ll never do it again.

In what way, in ANY way, is this supportive of women in fandom? Of fanfic writers? Of future original fiction authors who are currently writing fanfic now? 

This whole essay is a litany of justification for marginalizing fanfic writers, by a fanfic writer: you’ll regret it later, people will make fun of you, it will damage your career, etc. etc. 

It’s not that these things aren’t true, because as her experiences show, they really are. The thing is, admitting “it happened to me!” can serve either as a dire warning to others not to follow your path, or as a battle cry to stand up for yourself. Sarah Rees Brennan fell squarely on the former, no matter her very minor insistence that “it shouldn’t be this way!” Essentially, her conclusion was not “I did nothing wrong and was attacked for it, those bastards” but “it’s my own fault I was humiliated and not taken seriously! Shame on me!!!!”

There are times when you can’t stand up to your attackers, for whatever reason, and I don’t judge her for not being a warrior 100% of the time. But she never even tried to stand up for herself, not during or after the attacks, and not now. She feels bad about writing fanfic instead. She goes out of her way to prove that nothing she’s ever written was in any way influenced by her fandoms (I seriously doubt that, and worse, claiming that is in no way going to convince her detractors it’s not true; all she’s doing is disowning something that was once important to her and remains important to other people for the sake of approval by the mainstream publishing world. Let me know how that works out for ya’. Great example you’re setting there, hooyeah.)

What I want is a world where a fanfic-turned-pro author of original YA stories, when asked if she ever wrote fanfic, says “Hell yeah, what, you’ve got a problem with that?”

A world where women aren’t ashamed of the hobbies we’ve claimed for ourselves, and don’t feel the need to excuse our “poor behavior” for the sake of mainstream validation.

If you are a young woman who writes fanfic, please, I beg of you: DO NOT LISTEN TO SARAH REES BRENNAN.

Write what you love. Explore. Move on. Return to your roots. Stand up for yourself. Defend what you love. 

Don’t take shit from anyone who tries to shame you into social compliance. 

Me, I’ve actually posted several defenses of fanfiction.  I write erotica under under a pseudonym, my fics under a different, and my scholarly work is under my real name.  If someone outed me as a fic writer, whoop-de-doo.  I honestly don’t care at this point in my life.  My boss doesn’t care, my mortgage company certainly doesn’t, and if I’m outed, I’ll defend it.  A LOT of the so-called canon is basically fan fiction, and it’s about time that someone pointed this out.

What I want is a world where a fanfic-turned-pro author of original YA stories, when asked if she ever wrote fanfic, says “Hell yeah, what, you’ve got a problem with that?”

Meet Seanan McGuire. Her YA hasn’t been published yet, but she has a lot of urban fantasy and horror-flavored sci-fi books.

Seanan McGuire is amazing. I really love her books and I think she’s a wonderful person.

However, I am not a fan of the idea that we need to condemn one woman (uh, in this case: me) to lift up another.

Nor am I a fan of people saying women should be ashamed of themselves for their own feelings—or for talking about those feelings.

I’m not, when I think rationally about it, ashamed I wrote fanfiction.

I’m SORRY I did it. I regret doing it because it led to such horrible consequences. That doesn’t mean it was a bad thing to do. I’m also sorry I walked down the street where I got mugged. It was not at all my fault I was mugged, but I sure am sorry I went down that street, it turned out poorly for me! That’s a crucial difference.

If I have sometimes felt ashamed—it is because people are constantly trying to shame me, and it is HARD not to feel ashamed when that happens. That’s how misogyny works—horrible things happen to you, crappy things are said about you, until you feel ashamed of things you originally didn’t feel ashamed of. 

I’m so tired. I’m almost tired enough to just wish I hadn’t written the essay at all. I certainly do wish I’d used pseudonyms like one of the posters above—there’s a reason people use pseudonyms. 

I’m so tired, but I do want to stand up for myself and for others. So let’s take this point by point. (As ever—please, dearest darling readers, don’t go after the poster, or anyone else involved. It feels so unbelievably awful to be gone after. I wouldn’t wish it on anyone. Let me do this.)

You know who hates her most of all for this?

HERSELF.

I don’t hate myself. 

A lot of people hate me, and they keep telling me that I’m a terrible writer, that I’m ugly, that I’m a bad example, that I should shut up. But I don’t believe them, and I don’t hate myself.

I try to be a good person, and I think sometimes I succeed. I think I’ve written good if flawed books and I’m really proud of them, even though people tell me I shouldn’t be.

I don’t need to say ‘Shame on me!’ when other people are telling me I’m ‘PART OF THE PROBLEM’ in capitals as if the most important thing I should know is that I should definitely be ashamed of myself for something.

In what way, in ANY way, is this supportive of women in fandom? Of fanfic writers? Of future original fiction authors who are currently writing fanfic now?

This is some stuff I said in the essay that is supportive of women in fandom and fanfic writers.

I think it would be great if fandom wanted to celebrate its own’' (because its own have done some seriously impressive things, as listed in the essay)

I’m troubled by the way people, inside and outside of fandom, consistently act like being a published writer who used to write fanfiction is something shameful that those writers should be punished for.' (If I'm troubled by it… does it not follow that I don't feel that way?)

I still think fanfiction is lovely and fandom can be lovely.

I think fanfiction is a really lovely idea. I think it’s cool that people love a story so much they want to write more stories spinning off it, what-ifs and could-have-beens, that they want to spend more time with the characters and in a world they love. They love the story so much they want to devote a lot of time and work to it. That is great.

I think that’s supportive. I do support them. I have tried to reply to every fanfiction writer or former fanfiction writer who wrote to me—or who I just saw talking about the essay—with reassurance and support.

The original poster goes on to say:

'What I want is a world where a fanfic-turned-pro author of original YA stories, when asked if she ever wrote fanfic, says “Hell yeah, what, you’ve got a problem with that?”'

Wonderful! You have that world. I WAS open about it from the very start. I told everyone my name, I connected it all up. I said ‘Hell yeah.’ Whenever people asked me if I’d written it, I said yes. I often volunteered the information. I wasn’t ‘embarrassed and humiliated’ by that—but I did often feel truly horrible that malicious strangers would come and try to make me feel horrible by mentioning it, often in the same breath as telling me how awful I was or how awful my books were.

Being open had consequences. Discussing those consequences is important to me, because I cannot be a one-woman engine of change, and I’m not ashamed I cannot be. I think we all need to change.

What *I* want is a world where people can be open about having written fanfic, and not be told how awful they are both by the ‘mainstream’ and *by fandom itself*.

She goes out of her way to prove that nothing she’s ever written was in any way influenced by her fandoms (I seriously doubt that, and worse, claiming that is in no way going to convince her detractors it’s not true; all she’s doing is disowning something that was once important to her and remains important to other people for the sake of approval by the mainstream publishing world

… Uh, if I was going for approval by the mainstream publishing world, I would have shut my mouth about fanfiction a) way back then and b) NOW. Ladies going on about sexism and fanfiction isn’t actually a golden ticket to mainstream publishing success. (Being a guy, writing about guys, being a quiet well-behaved woman: all likely to turn out better.)

When people want to dismiss work, they say that it’s fanfic, and I think that’s messed up for several reasons. 

I was actually very open about being influenced by work that I loved in my books. I wrote a ton of essays about said influences. Here is a relevant example of something I’m a huge fan of and that my recent series was definitely influenced by: http://sarahreesbrennan.com/2012/08/veronica-mars-is-smarter-than-everybody/

But people ignored the stuff I said I was influenced by, said I HAD to be influenced by other things and if I wasn’t they ‘seriously doubt that’, and I think that’s messed up.

The original poster is right saying that me saying something isn’t going to convince my detractors. I wasn’t trying to convince my detractors. I was saying ‘Why do I have these detractors, saying this very specific stuff? Let’s examine this. I think that’s messed up.’

The detractors said that I was definitely influenced by stuff I *don’t even like*, and said that meant my books were bad. I also think that’s messed up, on several levels.

To be absolutely clear: people saying I was lying about not being influenced by certain other works? Messed up.

People saying that books being influenced by other works means they’re bad? Also messed up.

When people talk about disliking a creator they compare them to fanfiction writers (even when they themselves are fanfiction writers) and I think that’s messed up: http://c-is-for-circinate.tumblr.com/post/79943493068/also-a-note-the-pain-goes-away-almost

It’s this self-hatred, constantly and casually expressed, that we need to recognise and think about. I think we need to stop being so down on fanfic, consciously and unconsciously, and I also think we need to stop being down on fanfic writers, both past and present. I think we need to stop being down on each other. I think we need to stop being so down on women writers, women’s actions and women’s hobbies, and women generally. I think we shouldn’t expect women, real and fictional, to be ‘examples’ before they are anything else. 

http://www.theatlantic.com/sexes/archive/2013/05/do-readers-judge-female-characters-more-harshly-than-male-characters/275599/

I think there needs to be a shift in attitude across the board.

I don’t think I should be ashamed of wishing that I hadn’t been hurt like this. 

And I don’t think I should be shamed for being honest about my feelings. This happened to me and it felt horrible. This happened to me, people treated me this way, I had these feelings, and they are legitimate. I can express them.

I don’t think I should be ashamed of writing fanfiction. I also don’t think that it should have led to any of the consequences I described in my essay. But it did.

I don’t think that writing this essay should have led to my picture getting mocked online, my looks and my personality being torn apart, but it did. 

I don’t think that writing this essay should have led to people telling me to shut up about sexism, that I don’t deserve to talk about it, and calling me a ‘whiny baby’ over and over again for doing so, but it did. 

It is very, very hard to feel good about yourself under circumstances like these, and I think it’s okay to talk about that, too.

Women are not only valuable if they remain somehow miraculously untouched and unaffected by the terrible things that have happened to them. Women who have been hurt should be allowed to talk about their complicated feelings about being hurt.

I don’t think the original poster and I actually disagree on fundamentals. (Well, the original poster thinks I should be ashamed and that I’m a liar. We disagree on me!) The original poster thinks that women should stand up for themselves: so do I. The original poster thinks fanfiction isn’t anything to be ashamed of: so do I.

I’m sure I didn’t say things perfectly. Nobody does. 

But here’s the thing: It’s a lot easier to condemn one woman, to say that she said things wrong and thus is a bad person should be ashamed of herself, than it is to say ‘This is a messed-up system and it’s messing people up and it needs to change.’

My essay didn’t close with the commentary saying I was sorry I’d written fanfiction.

What I said at the end of the essay—you know, what I wrote to sum up all the most important stuff—holds true. I’m not ashamed of saying it. 

I don’t want teenage girls writing fanfiction now to feel that they’re doing something inherently terrible, which must be hidden if they ever want to be real writers. I don’t want the writers of the future to get it in the neck like I do.

We have got to stop treating women like garbage (especially when we are women).

We have got to stop treating women’s hobbies like garbage (especially when they are our hobbies).’

I believe that. I believe in the writers of the future. I believe that a lot of them are going to be former/current fanfiction writers, and I believe they should have it easier than I did.

… So please. Stop treating me like garbage. My point is being proven over and over again. And I’m still not ashamed to say: it does hurt. It hurts a lot. I’m not talking about this for ‘mainstream validation’—talking about having written fanfiction is no way to get mainstream validation. I’m not saying it to ‘justify marginalizing fanfic writers’ because I was marginalised and it was horrible and I don’t want it to happen to anyone else.

Believe me, I wouldn’t be talking about this if it was just me. I know that talking about it only means I will get hurt more. I know that talking about it means I will go into my tag and see this stuff, and cry my damn eyes out (I know, I know, I have feelings and I express them through my face, I’m such a whiny baby/hysterical woman/bitch/bad example). I know what happens because I keep getting proof.

I am not going to benefit by writing this, and I did not benefit by writing my previous essay. This is not going to do me any good or get me approval. This is horrible to talk about. Just talking about it has had even more horrible consequences for me and believe me when I say, I was already sick to the teeth of horrible consequences.

'She never even tried to stand up for herself

I’m only talking about it because *this* is standing up for myself and others, the only way I know how—by being as honest as I can. I’m only talking about it because I believe it’s important, and I believe it might spare other women in the future—other women who are girls now.

Actually, I’m happy to say what the original poster wanted me to say, though I’m not going to call anyone names or tell them how they should feel about themselves.

I will say this.

I did nothing wrong (even though sometimes it feels like I did, because of how people have treated me) and I was attacked for it. And I’m still being attacked for it.

Dear Random Internet Jerk,

Way to come after someone for putting their honest experience out there and for being a real person with complicated feelings going through something you’ve never been through.

And way to undermine your own point by saying that you’re sure her fandoms (and even fandoms she was never in) are influences on her original fiction. Yeah, I guess there’s no stigma at all attached to being a fanfiction writer. Certainly you, random internet jerk, don’t judge her for it.

No love,

Me